Sunday, February 22, 2009

Sunday links: the price of tomatoes…

During the course of my week, I read quite a bit of food-related literature, either in print or on-line. I thought it would be good to share one or two informative food related articles that I read each week with all of you on a regular basis and link you to that site...hence the name, Sunday links...


The week, I read an article in the new March 2009 Gourmet Magazine by Barry Estabrook that absolutely needed to be passed on the USA food-lovers that read my blog. The article is also available on-line, and it is linked below.

I seldom purchase tomatoes during the winter months, but there are those few times I wanted to add the color to food still life that I was photographing or to a holiday platter that I have put one or two tomatoes in my market basket.

After reading this article, I will be ever so much more thoughtful about where I shop and what I choose when I need to purchase off-season, non locally grown produce. Please take the time to click over to Gourmet Magazine on-line and read this article.

Thank you all very much in advance.

The articel begins, “If you have eaten a tomato this winter, chances are very good that it was picked by a person who lives in virtual slavery.”

Click to continue reading:
The Politics of the Plate: The Price of Tomatoes

5 comments:

Peter said...

I have unfortunatley read similar info about tomato production in southern Europe! We can of course buy the Dutch ones, looking so nice, but perhaps rather to be considered as water containers!

Local and seasonal consumption is of course the best, taste wise, but the season is so short...

Katherine said...

this is just awful! i hate hearing things like this when i have tomatoes in my frig and on my counter!

Shelly said...

Welcome to the foodie blog roll. You have a great blog. We are very fortunate to live right outside Lancaster Amish Country so most of our meats and produce is indeed purchased locally via local farmers and orchards.

thumbbook said...

that is awful, but it's good that you shared this article. We should at least know where our food is coming from- Alisa@Foodista

sue said...

I had heard that before, but wasn't sure if it was true. How sad. Thanks for the heads up. I'll have to make salads without tomatoes in winter, or buy from local growers, which I prefer to do anyway.